Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Busy; Blogs; Computer Setup; and, Free Culture

I have had and still have a lot of school work for this evening. It's going to be a long night. But I wanted to say that I have received a few emails about trading blogs to be added to the list. They've been added and I will try to add anymore that I receive as soon as I can. Feel free to send yours in; otherwise, like I said before, I'll be adding a large amount very soon. Tomorrow will be a more lenient day (well, after the early morning).

Today was exciting in the market! Hope everyone of you came out alive. Personally, while I didn't have but a half hour at most to dedicate to trading, I did get the setup I talked about a few posts ago completely working. Because the account I'm trading is still short the day trading requirement, I got the screens running futures. It's pretty sweet how IBCharts allows connection to IB's TWS over a lan.

On a continuation of a former tangent, here's a quote from an amazing book called Free Culture by Lawrence Lessig. It's about intellectual property rights, so those of you only interested in trading will may want to call it quits for the evening on this page =) Check out some of the links below or to the right. Otherwise:

"For some films, the benefit of releasing the film may well exceed these costs [lawyer fees to clear rights]. But for the vast majority of them, there is no way the benefit would outweigh the legal costs. Thus, for the vast majority of old films, Agee argued, the film will not be restored and distributed until the copyright expires.

But by the time the copyright for these films expires, the film will have expired. These films were produced on nitrate-based stock, and nitrate stock dissolves over time. They will be gone, and the metal canisters in which they are now stored will be filled with nothing more than dust."

Please stand up against the insanity that our copyright laws have become. Patents expire after 20 years, while copyrights after the 1920's go on, currently, practically indefinitely. It benefits a few large corporations who have control of old icons that still make them money, but it also destroys a good portion of the history of our culture. Copyright is supposed to encourage innovation, not destroy knowledge.

Don't let the talking heads dumb the debate down. I'm not advocating pirating or copyright infringement of new works. I'm advocating the preservation of culture and spread of knowledge that no longer needs protection, as the innovation it contributed to society has long since been compensated.

Freedom is one of my passions...take care everyone.

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